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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 13, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at nine. nicola sturgeon announces plans to hold a second independence referendum for scotland, claiming the prime minister is ignoring the wishes of scottish voters on britain leaving the eu. i believe that it would be wrong for scotland to be taken down a path that it has no control over, regardless of the consequences for our economy, for our society, for our place in the world, for our very sense of who we are as a country. but the response from downing street is forthright, accusing the scottish government of losing sight of the main issues. instead of playing politics with the future of our country, the scottish government should focus on delivering good government and public services for the people of scotland. politics is not a game. i'm ben brown, i'll be reporting
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from the official residence of scotland's first minister with the announcement today that she will be seeking a second independence referendum. and the other main stories on bbc news. mps vote to reject the changes made by the lords to the government's brexit bill. the ayes to the right, 335. the noes to the left, 287. so the ayes have it. live at westminster — lords are voting again on whether to accept the commons vote or resist as government sources say the triggering of article 50 will delayed until the end of the month. rail services on some of the busiest lines in england and disrupted due toa lines in england and disrupted due to a 24—hour strike. the queen launches the baton relay for the next commonwealth games, which will be held on the gold coast of australia next spring. and in sport
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manchester united see red as they ta ke manchester united see red as they take on chelsea for the last remaining place in the fa cup semifinals. isa is a very good evening to you from edinburgh, we live at bute house, the official residence of scotland's first minister. nicola sturgeon to many people by surprise today by announcing that she is seeking a second independence referendum. she wa nts second independence referendum. she wants that vote to be held between autumn 2018 and spring 2019. she's accused theresa may of refusing to compromise in her desire for a hard brexit, warning this would leave scotland outside the single market. meanwhile at westminster tonight two
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important meanwhile at westminster tonight two im porta nt votes meanwhile at westminster tonight two important votes in the house of commons. mps have tonight voted to reject the changes made by the lords to the government's brexit bill. those amendments were defeated in the house of commons. 385—287 was the final vote. they voted against the amendment guaranteeing the rights of european national ‘s living in the uk. and mps also voted to reject the amendment that would have given parliament a vote on the final brexit deal. the brexit bill has now gone back to the house of lords in what is called ping—pong in parliamentary terms, the lords are debating it now. let's ta ke the lords are debating it now. let's take a look at what is going on in the house of lords. for the people do have a final say on the outcome of those negotiations but i can say that there were two things also on my mind when i went through the lobby. the first was that the
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government were making it crystal clear, even at that stage, that they would concede nothing with regard to the amendments, and the second thing i had the amendments, and the second thing ihad in the amendments, and the second thing i had in my mind was that the noble lady, lady smith of basildon, had already indicated that if the bill we re already indicated that if the bill were returned to this house you would concede everything. the noble lord is absolutely wrong on that point, if he is to quote me, you should do so correctly. but i've always said is that in this house respect the privacy of the other place. we've also said, no extended ping—pong but we've also said we would listen to what the commons as to say. if he believes that voting for this amendment tonight it will change the mind of the other place, go ahead but don't give false hope to people who want the other side to think again. you got us into this mess! laughter
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the noble lady's argument makes no sense. she herself has voted in many many divisions... that's the latest from the house of lords in westminster. but the drama of the day began in edinburgh with a fat announcement from nicola sturgeon here at her official residence, bute house, that she is seeking a second independence referendum. let's get a report on that now from our scotland editor, sarah smith. since she was 15, nicola sturgeon has dreamed of an independent scotland. now brexit may provide the chance. as she says it means scotland must be given a fresh choice. what scotland deserves, in the light of the material change in circumstances brought about by the brexit vote, is the chance to decide our future in a fair, free and democratic way. there should be a referendum, she says, before the uk leaves the eu, some time between the autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019.
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0pinion polls still don't suggest more than 50% of the country would want to vote for independence. the economic circumstances are much harderfor you than they were in 2014. do you really believe you could win another referendum? yes, i do. absolutely i believe that. i believe that it would be wrong for scotland to be taken down a path it has no control over, regardless of the consequences for our economy, our society, our place in the world, for our very sense of who we are as a country. that would be wrong, and therefore my judgment is that we should have that choice. a referendum could have been avoided, she says, if the uk government had been prepared to allow a separate brexit deal for scotland. we have worked hard, really hard, to try to find agreement. the prime minister and her
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government have been given every opportunity to compromise. our efforts have instead been met with a brick wall of intransigence. in the scottish parliament, a majority of msps do support another independence referendum. but the snp‘s opponents will try to stop it. i think this was a deeply irresponsible action from the first minister. she has given up any pretence of acting for all of scotland and is now purely pursuing her own partisan ideals. she has no mandate for a second referendum. she lost her majority at the last scottish referendum. the people of scotland have told her time and again they do not want to be dragged back to that division. nicola sturgeon tells us she is forcing this debate on us because of brexit — how can creating more division and uncertainty be a good thing? nicola sturgeon has seized the initiative today and taken theresa may by surprise. she did not know this announcement was coming. but nicola sturgeon will need the agreement of the uk government before she can have another independence referendum. theresa may could refuse to allow
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it, or she could insist any vote takes place after brexit is complete, after the whole of the uk has left the eu. when the prime minister first met the first minister here in edinburgh injuly, she said she wanted to reach a uk wide agreement on brexit. that clearly failed. so now they will have to get together and try to agree the terms for another independence referendum. their predecessors negotiated and signed a dealfor the last referendum. it may not be so amicable this time around. there is a lot at stake. their example shows what happens to leaders who lose referendums. there are some in scotland who can't wait for another referendum, already preparing for another yes campaign. 0thers positively dread the prospect. 0pinion polls suggest voters are fairly evenly divided. so both nicola sturgeon and theresa may know that whenever it happens, this is a vote that really could go either way.
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sarah smith, bbc news, edinburgh. let's just take you back to westminster, the house of lords floating again on the brexit bill. we will bring you that result as soon as we we will bring you that result as soon as we get it. to watch more coverage from the house of lords you can watch that on bbc parliament. let's go back to the call from scotland's first minister for a second scottish independence referendum. joining me now from our aberdeen studio is maggie chapman, co—convenor of the scottish green party. thank you forjoining us. you support the snp in their call for another referendum, can you explain why? yes, we do. we have seen that since the referendum vote injune last year attempts from the scottish first minister, from people across the political spectrum in scotland to engage in a constructive way with the uk government have fallen on deaf ears. any suggestion of a compromise for scotland has gone
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nowhere. we have heard there will be deals for nissan, for the car industry. there has been no suggestion that there can be any option for scotland to remain in the single market. when we were voting on the eu referendum lastjune, i think most people thought that membership of the common market would still be given, and that is clearly not the case. it's been rolled out by theresa may and is only right that given the economic impact of brexit and the very changed political environment we have no in scotland, that scottish people have the right to determine their own future. scottish people voted, not very long ago, in a referendum and that was supposed to be, according to the snp and nicola sturgeon, a once in a generation vote! khan that's right, the vote in 2014, what was called a once in a generation vote but so much has
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changed since then. brexit offers us are quite drastic change in circumstances. we see scotland wanting to reach out into the world, wanting to reach out into the world, wanting to reach out into the world, wanting to create opportunities and open its doors to people at a time when the westminster government is using european citizens as a bargaining chip in european negotiations. we see the uk government determined to make the uk are closed and isolated country, and that's not the kind of future we wa nt that's not the kind of future we want for scotland and i don't think it's the kind of feature that most scots wa nt it's the kind of feature that most scots want now. we need european citizens in our nhs, as doctors and nurses, we need them in our universities and a decision taken in the parliament just today universities and a decision taken in the parliamentjust today means that those eu citizens have no guarantee of their place in scotland, never mind the rest of the uk. we are determined that scotland deserves something much better. we are not going down the road where people are
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demonised because of where they come from, we are not going down the road where we turn our backs on refugee children. we are not going down the road where we say we will accept posterity cuts. we want to be able to decide the future for scotland in scotla nd to decide the future for scotland in scotland and the scottish people will now have that choice. maggie chapman, co—convenor of the scottish green party, thank you for being with us. let's get the other side of the argument. with me now is alex cole—hamilton, lib dem msp for edinburgh western. thank you forjoining us. you are against the idea of independence, a second referendum. why do you think nicola sturgeon has called it today? nicola sturgeon has called it today? nicola sturgeon has clearly been working towards this day for the best pa rt working towards this day for the best part of two and a half years. her government has been asleep at the wheel on things like nhs and educational standards because of this obsession with independence.
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she is using brexit as a trojan horse to bring about her lifelong ambition of separation from the rest of the uk. but her argument is that everything has changed with that june 23 referendum that saw the vote for brexit. that is her argument that that argument has changed over recent weeks and months. the snp never talk about full membership of the eu for an independent scotland now, because there is a significant flank of the snp which is opposed to joining the eu. she is trying to play both horses here. on 100 play both horses here. 0n100 peeling to voters who voted no in the last referendum yet want to go back into the eu, yet at the same time to come down her brexit supporting nationalist troops to say, guys, we arejust supporting nationalist troops to say, guys, we are just talking about customs union. if you look at the opinion polls they've changed quite a bit since the last independence
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referendum in scotland. there is much more support independence.” don't think that's true. have hovered around the same 55—45, never the sort of 60% nicola sturgeon said she needed to bring it home. the more significant opinion poll is the opinion poll of the scottish public or simply do not want another referendum. the most important part of that is because they recognise how divisive the last one was, a survey said one in four scottish people have had damaged relationship with either a family member or a close friend because they were on opposing sides of the yes — no divide in the last referendum and now she wants to put us through that again. should theresa may agree to a second referendum, whether she likes it or not? that is up to theresa may. my position is clear. the liberal democrats were elected last year on a mandate that unequivocally opposes second referendum and we'll do that at every stage in the
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parliamentary process. good to talk to you, thank you for being with us. let's get the perspective from westminster. we can speak now to torcuil crichton, westminster editor of the daily record newspaper. thank you forjoining us. why do you think nicola sturgeon made this announcement today, she took many people by surprise. she upset the script, the choreography was always there, she was always going to call it for 2018 if she could, although people expected theresa may to trigger article 51st and then for nicola sturgeon to respond by demanding that she grabbed a second referendum. she's switched the dance today, nicola sturgeon, and grabbed the headlines and grabbed the initiative. she's gone on the front foot. some people have suggested that perhaps she was persuaded or pushed into this position are hardliners within the snp. is that
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how you see it? i don't think nicola sturgeon would need much persuasion! she's made a calculation, that being based on 2018 being the best chance because if she waits for 2021 scottish election she may no longer have an independent majority in the scottish parliament and if she waits beyond 2019 britain and scotland will be out of the european union, she won't be able to sell the line that scotland could remain in the eu. and she can't wait for a labour revival. that's the real change in circumstance. the sky hasn't fallen in yet, life has carried on as normal, it seems, we still to hit that brexit bang. what has happened is that there is no labour opposition across the uk as a bulloch against the snp and that is really advantageous. —— is a bulloch
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against the snp and that is really advantageous. —— possible walk. —— asa advantageous. —— possible walk. —— as a bulwark. how should he play this? very carefully, there was no substantive response from theresa may, repeated call for nicola to get on with the dayjob or from the scottish secretary who accused the scottish secretary who accused the scottish first minister of being obsessed with independence. they've got to be careful not to fall into the trap that nicola sturgeon has said. if they refuse permission for a scottish independence referendum, that would boost support for independence. but they do have room for manoeuvre on the timing. should be held before we know what brexit means? 0therwise voters would vote in the dark and would not know what the choices were. should it be the timing, who should vote? european citizens voted in the last independence referendum and
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obviously what the questions would be, it would be do you want to stay in the uk this time, not do want scotla nd in the uk this time, not do want scotland to go independent? i don't think theresa may would give that one away. that's quite a bit down the road yet. good to talk to you, torcuil crichton, editor of the daily record. a fascinating day to day in which nicola sturgeon made that momentous and, for many people surprising announcement that she is seeking a second scottish independence referendum. that is the latest from edinburgh. back to you in the studio. thank you, ben. let's bring you up—to—date with the headlines. nicola sturgeon has announced plans to hold a second independence referendum for scotland, claiming that the prime minister is ignoring the wishes of scottish voters on britain leaving the eu. theresa may has delivered
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a forthright response, accusing scotland's first minister of tunnel vision and wanting to set a course for uncertainty and division. live at westminster lords voting again on whether to accept the government's brexit bill as government's brexit bill as government sources say the triggering of article 50 will be delayed until the end of the month. let's ta ke let's take you live to the house of lords now. the vote is imminent on the amendments rejected by the house of commons earlier this evening. let's follow what is being said. we are told the vote is imminent. they have voted, contents, 135, not
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content is, 274. so the not contents have it. the question is now that motion a b agreed to, as many of that opinion will say content, the contrary not content, the contents have it. motion b. lord bridges. if you mark my lords, i beg to move motion b, that this has does not
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insist on the amendment to which the other posters agreed. to clarify the vote that you saw a reference to, not co nte nt vote that you saw a reference to, not content were the predominant result in that result announced by lord fowler which means that has come down on the side of the government. if that were the higher figure, which it was, it has come down on the side of the government, which tends to fit in with the pattern that was predicted by those at westminster this evening, that as at westminster this evening, that as a result of what the house of commons decided to do with those two amendments earlier, that the house of lords, having initially decided to put those amendments back to the house of commons, will no longer pursue that issue in the same way. that would appear to be the case on the basis of what you have seen in the basis of what you have seen in the last few moments. now let's bring you up—to—date with the sport. his tim. it's the fourth and final fa cup
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quarterfinal and a great match, chelsea at home to former manager jose mourinho, with manchester united. it's been a difficult evening with manchester united down to ten men after ander herrera was sent off after a second yellow card after that foul on eden hazard. he was pretty furious. n'golo kante opened the scoring for chelsea with only his second goal of the season early in the second—half. this is what is happening at the moment, it's live on bbc one. cesc fabregas is about to come on for chelsea, they are still leading with just ten minutes to go, united missing zlatan through suspension and rooney and martial. irina only had rashford as his solitary striker —— mourinho bunny hat. and now his side trailing, 1—0 with ten minutes to go. chelsea on the attack. and you
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can watch the game on bbc one. liverpool and birmingham have already expressed an interest in hosting the 2022 commonwealth games after it was announced earlier that the event would not take place in durban, the south african city was going to be the first south african post but indicated recently that it faced financial difficulties —— the first african host. the authorities has said it is searching for potential candidate hosts. they are unwilling to accede to some of the demands of the south african organisation for sport to funding the games. they wanted a return on investment and there was a discrepancy on the that was presented, believed to be $120 million less than what was seen to be provided by the ministry of sport. when it came to the issues of
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funding, economic growth of the country was said to be 0.3% last year so there are pressing needs in the country than the treasury has provided, the kind of funding required to host the games. chris froome has given his support to team sky team principal sir dave brailsford, saying without him there is no team sky. his boss says he won't resign despite the wood antidote and authorities investigation into a mysterious package delivered to sub bradley wiggins. chris froome apologised for the way things had been handled, both dave brailsford and team sky deny any wrongdoing. this is some of the statement from chris froome in which she says that he completely understands why people feel let down by the way in which the situation has been handled. going forward we can do better, i know it will take time forfaith to can do better, i know it will take time for faith to be restored but i
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will do my utmost to ensure that happens. along with everyone else at tea m happens. along with everyone else at team sky. protests this evening by fa ns team sky. protests this evening by fans of two of the biggest clubs in french rugby union after it was announced that they are to merge. paris—based stade francais and racing 92 see they need to pool their resources to cope with the challenges of performance and education —— that's what they say. it's a big shock as chrisjones explains. their owners say they need to pool their resources and become one club. it's the equivalent of saracens and harlequins merging, or in football, tottenham and arsenal merging! two london sides. it really isa merging! two london sides. it really is a bizarre story. the kind of story that only french rugby seems able to throw up. that's all the sport for now. i'll be back with sportsday at 10:30pm. chelsea still leading 1—0 in that fa cup quarterfinal. thank you. let's
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repeat that vote in the house of lords, voting by a majority of 139 to reject the amendment that would have required the government to retain measures for eu nationals in the uk to keep their rights. the next vote on the next amendment coming through very shortly. let's bring you up—to—date with the weather forecast now. hello,. bring you up—to—date with the weatherforecast now. hello,. winter refusing to link wish its grip on parts of north america. a cold weekend through the north—east, in new york, minus two celsius in daytime, well below the average for this time of year. if you think that was cold, spare a thought for residents over the great lakes, this isa residents over the great lakes, this is a house near lake ontario, covered in ice as rough seas are lapping on the shore, close to the house, and freezing on contact.
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looks like something out of narnia. snow has moved as far south as arkansas and we have seen a dusting of light snow and the same for tennessee. 0ne of light snow and the same for tennessee. one area of low pressure we re tennessee. one area of low pressure were developed and made another front pushing through the great la kes front pushing through the great lakes and through monday night into tuesday, we will see a classic north—east storm developing. significant moisture bumping into that cold air, on the leading edge, there will be potential for some disruptive snow, and that code north—easterly wind feeding around it, just making for blizzard like conditions. we could see as much as 25 centimetres in places, nearly as much as 50 centimetres before the storm clear through on wednesday. behind, cold winds, ice could be an issue, so it really has the potential to cause some major disruption. a bitterly cold day on
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wednesday continues with temperatures struggling to climb above freezing. from extreme cold to extreme record—breaking heat because on saturday in spain it was a different story, it was the warmest march day on record in alicante, 35 degrees the recorded high. that changed pretty abruptly as well. cold air spilling down from the north of the next few days, temperatures significantly lower and stormy weather here as well, from an area of low pressure moving in from the balearics bringing heavy rain, strong easterly winds, the potential for localised flooding due to the intensity of that rainfall as it arrives. by tuesday the worst that will be sinking down to gibraltar, any height, there will be snow as well, that could be an issue it slowly moves steadily west, the brighter vibrant slowly moves steadily west, the brighter vibra nt colours denote slowly moves steadily west, the brighter vibrant colours denote the intensity of the rain, something to keep a close eye on. once it clears
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out of the way and improving picture although we could continue to seek shop thundery downpours towards the latter stages of the week. in europe generally, relatively quiet, a spell of windy weather across the north—west of the uk into scandinavia, and its leading edge it could bring significant snow as well. —— on its leading edge. this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm laura trevelyan. it's being called the largest humanitarian crisis in over half a century. 20 million people now face a deadly famine. we're in somalia, where the situation is dire. as things stand, they only have enough supplies here to help one in ten of those who need it, and there is little doubt things are going to get a lot worse. where's the proof? the numbers are in, a congressional report lays out how many could lose coverage under the new white house health care plan. and from viral videos to photography, a new exhibit shows us how social change is being captured before our eyes.
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